Monthly Archives: March 2014

Taking Action

Lesson plan for teachers

Book “George went to see the Prime Minister”

Concept:

Being aware of others less fortunate, demonstrates the development of our emotional intelligence and sense of social justice through empathy. Sometimes we are aware of situations that, though they are very upsetting, we cannot do anything about them. It is also important to be aware of current issues that affect our planet and the people on it.

In the book George went to see the Prime Minister, George is ‘taking action’, she is ‘doing something about’, the issue of ethical buying. In our real world (not the children’s story) we don’t have someone in charge of the whole world who can make changes. We can, however make some small changes ourselves or we can alert others in power, about issues. For the sake of the learning, we will assume there is a Prime Minister of the World.

Lesson plan

As a group, read George went to see the Prime Minister

Go back to the page where George is telling her father that she is going to see the Prime Minister of the World.

Class discussion:

Teachers, select some issues to discuss (select issues which don’t take away from your students’ childhood innocence but that will help them develop a social conscience). You can probably think of many but if not, here are some random suggestions (or you might select some as a class by having an initial discussion):

  • Give them a scenario of someone in their local neighbourhood that doesn’t look after their dog. The owner doesn’t feed it enough and it is cold at night. What could be done?
  • Turtles main food is jelly fish. They often get confused when they see a plastic bag and eat it which makes them sick
  • Weed spraying – in our local park or school. What are the benefits? What are could be done instead?

As a class discuss some of these issues.

Group task:

Divide into small groups or pairs. Ask each group or pair to write a one page letter, to the Prime Minister of the World about the issue following these headings:

What is the issue?

Why is it a problem?

What might the solution be?

(Don’t worry too much about inaccuracies. It is more important to get them thinking about the fact that they can actually take some action about an issue that is worrying them.)

 

Parents – this is a family activity

Book “George went to see the Prime Minister”

Concept:

Being aware of others less fortunate, demonstrates the development of our emotional intelligence and sense of social justice through empathy. Sometimes we are aware of situations that, though they are very upsetting, we cannot do anything about them. It is also important to be aware of current issues that affect our planet and the people on it.

In the book George went to see the Prime Minister, George is ‘taking action’, she is ‘doing something about’, the issue of ethical buying. In our real world (not the children’s story) we don’t have someone in charge of the whole world who can make changes. We can, however make some small changes ourselves or we can alert others in power, about issues. For the sake of the learning, we will assume there is a Prime Minister of the World.

Family activity

As a family, read George went to see the Prime Minister

Go back to the page where George is telling her father that she is going to see the Prime Minister of the World.

Family discussion:

Parents or grandparents, select some issues to discuss (select issues which don’t take away from your children’s childhood innocence but that will help them develop a social conscience). You can probably think of many but if not, here are some random suggestions (or you might select some as a family by having an initial discussion):

  • Give them a scenario of someone in their local neighbourhood that doesn’t look after their dog. The owner doesn’t feed it enough and it is cold at night. What could be done?
  • Turtles main food is jelly fish. They often get confused when they see a plastic bag and eat it which makes them sick
  • Weed spraying – in our local park or school. What are the benefits? What are could be done instead?

As a family discuss some of these issues.

Task:

Develop a one page letter as a family, to the Prime Minister of the World (if you actually know who might have some influence about this then write to that person, or Council etc – if not you could use the scenario that there is a Prime Minister of the World) about the issue following these headings:

What is the issue?

Why is it a problem?

What might the solution be?

(Don’t worry too much about inaccuracies. It is more important to get them thinking about the fact that they can actually take some action about an issue that is worrying them.)

2 new reviews

Great to have our recent reviews! Awesome when our readers take the time to write what the think! We’d love to know how other readers find our books:

See review on our ‘review tab’: Great stories. I love the way they can be used to facilitate a discussion about the issues. So important to develop these key language and literacy skills. I’m a language, literacy, numeracy specialist and I can really see great value in these stories. They are so authentic and real – this is the best way to develop literacy skills. The lesson plans are fantastic too – great value for the time poor!

See review on one of our posts: A refreshing way to raise awareness about issues facing kids in caring for the world they are inheriting. The books examine each issue in a non-threatening but thought provoking way. Great to see suggested activities for family and school.

Valuing our food

For Teachers

Book “George and the problem of food”

Concept:

Thinking about how we have such inequalities of the availability of food in our world, we want to teach our young people the value of food. As we look at every piece of food we have on our table, we think about the journey that it has taken to reach us. We also use this opportunity to teach sustainability and good environmental practice because we are not wasting food.

In the story, “George and the problem of food”, George is alerted to the problem that some people do not have enough food to eat, some use it for cooking competitions – which devalues its purpose, most restaurants these days serve enough for two people in one serving, and there are many people who are homeless and eating out of a rubbish dump.

Lesson plan

As a group, read George and the problem of food

Go back to the page where the Prime Minister is turning the globe and talking about the different relationships that people on our planet have with food.

Class discussion:

Teachers, select some different foods and bring them to class or ask your students. Fruit and vegetables are perfect to look at, but you can also choose grains.

As a class look at one of the pieces of food that is chosen and discuss some of the following:

  • How did it get to our table?
  • Was it planted?
  • Picked?
  • Packaged in plastic?
  • Transported in a truck?
  • Unpacked in a supermarket and sold?
  • Bought and taken home in a car?
  • Put in the refrigerator for a day?
  • Taken to school for lunch?

Individual task:

Ask your students to select a piece of food and take it back to their workstation and create any of the following:

  • A digital story about the food’s journey from beginning to now
  • A poster
  • A flowchart of its journey

Don’t worry too much about inaccuracies. It is more important to get them thinking about the journey and the value of the food.

For Families

Book “George and the problem of food”

Concept:

Thinking about how we have such inequalities of the availability of food in our world, we want to teach our young people the value of food. As we look at every piece of food we have on our table, we think about the journey that it has taken to reach us. We also use this opportunity to teach sustainability and good environmental practice because we are not wasting food.

In the story, “George and the problem of food”, George is alerted to the problem that some people do not have enough food to eat, some use it for cooking competitions – which devalues its purpose, most restaurants these days serve enough for two people in one serving, and there are many people who are homeless and eating out of a rubbish dump.

Family activity

As a family, read George and the problem of food

Go back to the page where the Prime Minister is turning the globe and talking about the different relationships that people on our planet have with food.

Family discussion:

Parents let’s look at some food you have at home. Fruit and vegetables are perfect to look at, but you can also choose grains.

As a family look at one of the pieces of food you have in the house and discuss some of the following:

  • How did it get to our table?
  • Was it planted?
  • Picked?
  • Packaged in plastic?
  • Transported in a truck?
  • Unpacked in a supermarket and sold?
  • Bought and taken home in a car?
  • Put in the refrigerator for a day?
  • Taken to school for lunch?

Task:

Can we create any of the following and put it on our fridge this week, to apply our learning?

  • A digital story about the food’s journey from beginning to now – print for the fridge
  • A poster
  • A flowchart of its journey

Don’t worry too much about inaccuracies. It is more important to get them thinking about the journey and the value of the food.